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Cultural Diversity: Home

Resources to support cultural diversity at Norwood Secondary College

                            Source: Womanizer

This page is your guide to all things cultural diversity at Norwood. Click through the tabs below to find resources to support culturally diverse students and their friends.

What to do if you're experiencing racism

Australia is home to people from many different cultures. If you’re reading this, you might speak a language other than English at home, might have been born overseas, or have at least one parent who was born overseas. Cultural diversity is one of our greatest strengths as a nation; but, sadly, racism and hate still exist. If you're experiencing racism, this guide from ReachOut might be able to help you.


How Leeza reconnected with her cultural identity

Read about how Leeza reconnected with her Filipino cultural identity and learnt to balance her Australian culture with her heritage.


Where do you feel like you belong?

Feeling like you don't fit in can be really hard, and leave you feeling left out and isolated. We know feeling connected is really important for your mental health and wellbeing, as it helps you to feel valued and welcomed. These young people share where they feel like they belong - and their answers might surprise you. Where do you feel like you belong?


What Chinese New Year means to Roseanna

Roseanna shares her story of Chinese New Year, what it means to her and how she celebrates it.


Conflict between family and culture

Feeling stuck between two cultures can create confusion and conflict: your family wants one thing, and you want something totally different. Australia is a multicultural country, so this is a very common situation for young Australians, but there are things you can do about it.

How Taliah pushes against Indigenous stereotypes and statistics

Taliah reflects on Aboriginal culture, Indigenous statistics, and how she takes care of herself when things get tough.


Sancia shares what her Aboriginal culture means to her

Listen as Sancia explains the importance of her family and her culture.


Yabun: Celebrating the strengths of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures

Every year people travel from far and wide to attend the Yabun Festival on January 26. Yabun is the largest gathering of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures in Australia, held upon the traditional lands of the Gadigal people in Sydney. With live music, stalls and traditional cultural performances, Yabun honours the survival of the world's oldest living culture. The ReachOut team hit up Yabun to chat to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people about the strength of their cultures.


Experiencing NAIDOC Week

Every year, the week beginning the first Sunday of July is National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) Week. It’s all about celebrating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture, achievements and history – and Shannay tells us why it’s such a great event, for more reasons than one.

 

Madhuraa’s story: ‘You don’t belong here’

Dealing with racist jokes can be hard as a New Australian. Click the link above to read Madhuraa's story and how she deals with casual racism.


Freedom Stories

Freedom Stories is a documentary based project that brings together a collection of personal stories from former people seeking asylum who sought asylum in Australia at a time of great political turmoil circa 2001, but who have long since dropped out of the media spotlight. The people who have participated in our project are all now Australian citizens. Given the ongoing controversies over ‘boat people’ it is timely that their stories be heard.

Understanding racism and how to spot it

The first step in stopping racism is understanding what it actually is. But that's not always easy. If you're not sure what racism is and what it looks like, that's okay. ReachOut has put together this handy guide to help you.


How to support people from different cultures

Whether you look at it from a social, creative or economic point of view, embracing cultural diversity can improve our lives in many ways. However, having a different culture and language can be challenging. This might range from being misunderstood by others or feeling unrepresented, to experiencing straight-up racial abuse. This guide can support you in supporting people from different cultures and standing up to racism.


Understanding a different culture

You’re living in a vibrant multicultural country, so it’s great that you want to understand cultures other than your own. There are a few ways to do this, but the most important is to remember that we’re all just people who are trying to do the best we can.


How to be an ally to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

This guide, written by Mununjali woman Alice Currie, is a great guide for allies wanting to support the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. 


Why cultural appropriation isn't cool

Rocking a Native American headdress at your next music festival may be a bigger deal than you first thought. Chances are you've heard about 'cultural appropriation', but it can be tricky to understand. Learning about what it is, when it happens and what makes it a big deal is a great way to avoid landing in a sticky or offensive situation.

 

Yarn Safe

Yarn Safe provides mental health and wellbeing support to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people and promotes the importance of talking about mental health issues.

                         

Original Power

Original Power is a small community-focused organisation that aims to build the power of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples through collective action.

Black Rainbow

National NFP advocacy platform and touchpoint for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander LGBQTI peoples — 100% Indigenous owned and operated.

 

Deadly Connections

Deadly Connections positively disrupts intergenerational disadvantage, grief, loss and trauma by providing holistic, culturally responsive interventions and services to First Nations people and communities, particularly those who have been impacted by the child protection and/or justice systems.

Djirra

Djirra is a place where culture is shared and celebrated, and where practical support is available to all Aboriginal women and particularly to Aboriginal people who are currently experiencing family violence or have in the past.

Elizabeth Morgan House

Elizabeth Morgan House provides a range of support to Aboriginal women and children experiencing family violence from crisis through to recovery programs.

Healing Foundation

The Healing Foundation is a national Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisation that partners with communities to address the ongoing trauma caused by actions like the forced removal of children from their families.

Seed Mob

Seed is Australia’s first Indigenous youth climate network. We are building a movement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people for climate justice with the Australian Youth Climate Coalition. Their vision is for a just and sustainable future with strong cultures and communities, powered by renewable energy.

Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service

Provides referrals, advice/information, duty work or case work assistance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples in the State of Victoria.

Weenthunga Health Network

A network of Victorians in all health roles who want to make a difference in Indigenous health.

 

Wirrpanda Foundation

Leads the provision of education and employment opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians by working together to empower and build capacity amongst individuals, their families and their communities.

 

Wurundjeri

Aboriginal cultural heritage work, cultural & educational services and land management.

Spectrum Youth Services

The Spectrum Youth Services team understands the needs of young people in a way that encourages community engagement and relationship building. Young people, predominantly from migrant and refugee backgrounds aged 12 to 25 have  access to a range of support services that include individual casework, referrals to other services, information about relevant topics, participation in sporting and recreational activities, leadership and advocacy training, and education support.

Refugee Council of Australia

The Refugee Council of Australia (RCOA) is the national umbrella body for refugees and people seeking asylum and those who support them. 

Centre for Multicultural Youth

The Centre for Multicultural Youth is a not-for-profit organisation based in Victoria, providing specialist knowledge and support to young people from migrant and refugee backgrounds.